Segments in this Video

Introduction: High Above The Trenches (02:06)

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Fighter planes used in World War I are predecessors to the modern F-16 Fighting Falcon and Mikoyan MiG-29. Early pilots fought each other at low speeds while manually sighting targets. Aircraft were initially used for reconnaissance.

First Aerial Strikes (04:33)

On August 25th, 1914, British BE-2A planes intercepted a German scout in the first successful air combat. Machine guns were established as aircraft weaponry. Sergeant Joseph Frantz and Corporal Louis Quenault flew a Voisin Pusher to shoot down an Aviatik.

Creating Fighters (03:28)

French aviator Roland Garros mounted a forward firing machine gun on a single seat Morane Saulnier. Anthony Fokker designed the Eindecker, fitting it with an interrupter gear to sync fire with propeller blades. Max Immelmann developed the Immelmann Turn.

Fokker Scourge and Eastern Front (05:33)

In February 1916, Germans launched the Battle of Verdun; the French introduced the Nieuport 17 and Bebe. William Vanderbilt funded the Lafayette Squadron. The Royal Flying Corps innovated single seat DH-2 Pushers and two seat FE-2B planes.

Bloody April (05:16)

In February 1916, Germans launched the Battle of Verdun; the French introduced the Nieuport 17 and Bebe. William Vanderbilt funded the Lafayette Squadron. The Royal Flying Corps innovated single seat DH-2 Pushers and two seat FE-2B planes.

From Spying to Fighting (04:01)

Germans developed the Flying Circus, dominating air space through numbers; Von Richtofen led the most famous squadrons in a red Fokker triplane. Air combat was typified by reconnaissance planes escorted by fighters; when opposing fighters and patrols attacked the scout, battles resulted.

Schooling Aviators (07:43)

In April 1917, the United States declared war on the Central Powers; their pilots and planes were not ready for action. Major Robert Smith Barry established guidelines for training procedures. The Avro 504 Trainer made landing and survival maneuvers easier to perfect; simulators modeled flight to develop targeting skills.

Allied Forces (03:48)

Four hundred Americans served with the British Royal Flying Corps during World War I. In spring 1918, Germans carried out five offensives; squadrons were sent to France in response. New pilots had to get familiar with the terrain, and learn formations and reconnaissance procedures while avoiding enemy fire.

World War I Aces (05:38)

Germany gave Baron Manfred von Richtofen a state funeral. Canadian Billy Bishop took 72 planes down, and was awarded the Victoria Cross; American Raoul Lufbery commanded the 94th squadron, training new pilots and leading formations.

Strains of Battle (04:44)

Fighting intensified in 1918; combat flying was difficult and stressful, and pilots had short life expectancies. In spring 1918, Germans issued parachutes; British authorities grounded aviators after six months on the front. Squadron commanders monitored exhaustion, having some diagnosed with “flying sickness debility.”

Fighter Legacy (03:04)

Aircraft were developed and battled until the end of World War I; air combat was romanticized. Allied and Central Forces treated prisoners of war well, and aces became national celebrities. Basic techniques innovated during the period are still used today.

Credits: High Above the Trenches (00:43)

Credits: High Above the Trenches

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Century Of Flight: High Above The Trenches

Part of the Series : Century of Flight
DVD (Chaptered) Price: $169.95
DVD + 3-Year Streaming Price: $254.93
3-Year Streaming Price: $169.95

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Description

In this episode of Century of Flight, we learn how airplanes went from unarmed reconnaissance scouts to custom fighters during World War I. Learn about the pilots that became “aces,” and celebrated as national heroes; discover how inexperienced Americans trained to become a force aiding Allied Forces in victory, and how techniques formulated then are still used today.

Length: 53 minutes

Item#: BVL185473

ISBN: 978-1-64623-948-1

Copyright date: ©1997

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video and Publisher customers.


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