Segments in this Video

Rodin and Modernity (05:55)

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Sculptor Auguste Rodin challenged the artistic standards of his time. The Industrial Revolution created a passion for modernity, which continued into art, music, and literature. The trend was slow to hit sculpture and Rodin struggled for acceptance in his early career.

Rodin the Apprentice (04:49)

Rodin moved from France to Brussels as a sculptor's apprentice. He submitted "The Age of Bronze" to the Paris Salon in 1877. It was accepted but an investigation into its authenticity nearly ruined his career.

"The Gates of Hell" (03:34)

The French government commissioned Rodin to make a door for a new art museum. He spent a year reading Dante's "Divine Comedy" and created plans for the piece. Art critic Octave Mirbeau defended Rodin's nonconformist style.

Rodin's Personal Life (04:36)

Rodin's lifelong companion, Rose Beuret, stayed with him as he became famous. He had an affair with Camille Claudel, an assistant in his studio. Rodin's relationship with Claudel inspired "The Kiss."

Rodin's Growing Fame (07:18)

Rodin sculpted a bust of author Victor Hugo and was commissioned to create a monument for the city of Calais. The city initially rejected the modern style of Rodin's piece. Rodin greatly profited from the growing popularity of art collecting.

Balzac Monument (07:44)

Rodin was commissioned to make a monument to French author Honore de Balzac. He researched Balzac for seven years before debuting the sculpture. The abstract nature of the sculpture drew criticism.

Rodin and his Students (02:23)

Rodin mostly gave-up on the traditional French system, which measured greatness by the number of monuments an artist had. Rodin lived in a villa outside Paris where he would mentor young sculptures.

Rodin's Continued Success (05:59)

Rodin built a pavilion for the 1900 World's Fair in Paris. He allowed photographs and film footage to be taken of his work and his studio.

Rodin's Creative Concept (08:44)

Rodin pushed the boundaries of sculpture, using new techniques and ideas. He sculpted dancers to capture movement and sensuality. He died in 1917, two years before the Rodin Museum opened in Paris.

Credits: Rodin In His Time (00:57)

Credits: Rodin In His Time

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Rodin In His Time


DVD (Chaptered) Price: $169.95
DVD + 3-Year Streaming Price: $254.93
3-Year Streaming Price: $169.95

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Description

The 19th century is like no other: an aesthetic, scientific and political bubbling is changing the face of the world. Paris is a genuine cultural hub. An intellectual and artistic elite was formed including Auguste Rodin. Bold and gifted, he and others altered this era forever. Rodin’s destiny is both singular and closely context related. Fed by a public and private correspondence, this film will draw the strands of his life and reminds the background when required. However, it will be anything but a commemoration: Rodin is still alive because eternal. In Paris, his sculptures are an integral part of the urban decor: The Penseur and Balzac at Varenne subway station, the D’Alembert at the town Hall… Through constant back and forth between past and present, this film is about Rodin’s spirit, forever among us.

Length: 53 minutes

Item#: BVL160976

ISBN: 978-1-64481-213-6

Copyright date: ©2016

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video and Publisher customers.

Only available in USA and Canada.


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