Segments in this Video

Taste and Smell: Introduction (01:47)

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The senses of taste and smell capture the chemical information of objects. When are afflicted by a cold, we often think food seems tasteless.

The Tongue (04:01)

Tongues help us chew and swallow food, and communicate with others. Internal muscles allow it to change its shape. Type of papillae include filiform, circumvallate, fungiform, and foliate.

Taste (03:31)

Flavor, smell, and texture play a role in how things taste. Humans can detect salty, sweet, sour, and bitter sensations; learn where each receptor is located on the tongue. Culture can influence taste. Belladonna and poison ivy possess a bitter taste.

Smell (03:26)

Smells travel up our nose to the olfactory receptors. Cilia connect directly to the brain by the cerebral limbic system. Dogs and eels have more olfactory organs than a human.

Access to Summary (02:02)

Type of papillae include filiform, circumvallate, fungiform, and foliate. Humans can detect salty, sweet, sour, and bitter sensations. Cilia connect directly to the brain by the cerebral limbic system.

Credits: Taste and Smell (00:39)

Credits: Taste and Smell

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Taste and Smell

Part of the Series : Just the Facts Senses Series
3-Year Streaming Price: $99.95

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Description

What are the organs of taste and smell, and how do they work together? Learn about the tongue’s functions of taste, an anatomical description of smell, and an explanation of their roles in tasting and smelling!

Length: 17 minutes

Item#: BVL155140

Copyright date: ©2013

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video, Dealer and Publisher customers.


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