Segments in this Video

The Human Ear: Introduction (01:39)

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Physical stimuli are transformed into sensations through our senses, allowing us to communicate with others. In addition to hearing, our ears contain balance and movement sensors.

Nature of Sound (03:29)

Vibrations cause sound waves to travel to our ears; strong vibrations have greater intensity. If the sound frequency is high, pitch increases. Dolphins and bats can hear ultrasonic sounds.

Structure of the Ear (04:19)

The ear contains the external ear, tympanic cavity, and inner ear. Sound waves strike the tympanic membrane which transfers it to the malleus, incus, and stapes bones. Vertigo occurs when the brain receives conflicting signals from the ear and the eye.

Perception of Sound (02:49)

Humans can communicate and enjoy music because of our sense of hearing. Noises above 100 decibels are annoying; prolonged exposure to noise can result in partial deafness.

Access to Summary (02:33)

Vibrations cause sound waves to travel to our ears; strong vibrations have greater intensity. The ear contains the external ear, tympanic cavity, and inner ear. Noises above 100 decibels are annoying; prolonged exposure to noise can result in partial deafness.

Credits: The Human Ear (00:39)

Credits: The Human Ear

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The Human Ear

Part of the Series : Just the Facts Senses Series
3-Year Streaming Price: $99.95

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Description

All about the human ear. Learn the structure of the human ear and how it facilitates hearing, a description of how the ear works, the characteristics of different sounds, sonic contamination, and more!

Length: 17 minutes

Item#: BVL155137

Copyright date: ©2013

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video, Dealer and Publisher customers.


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